The Taming of the Shrew – Elizabeth Taylor

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Elizabeth Taylor as Katerina

As part of the 400th Shakespeare anniversary, the staff at work (public library) dressed as characters from Shakespeare’s plays. The costume I wore is courtesy of Swan Theatre, a local amateur dramatic society. It was a great excuse to dress as Katerina from The Taming of the Shrew. 

I am wearing the same white maxi dress underneath this as the red Jamaica Inn dress. It was a good find on Topshop.com.

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Shakespearean theatre costume

I went for a messy undone beehive. Big rollers, setting lotion and hairspray! I brushed out the curls but didn’t comb into a flick, separating waves out. If only my hair was a bit longer.

 

 

 

Jamaica Inn – Mary Yellan

 

Jessica Brown-Findlay wears this lovely red dress in the BBC’s latest dramatisation of Jamaica Inn. I altered a pattern for a regency (Jane Austen) style dress.  The ‘blouse’ is actually a maxi dress from Topshop and the leather boots from La Redoute.

I watched the DVD several times to get the correct fastening detail and neckline. The gathers along the yoke give more width along with cutting it as an A-line skirt. This makes it practical for walking. I intend on taking this dress next time I go on holiday on the moors. You might get a picture of the muddy dress then!

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The real Jamaica Inn, as it is today

As promised, I have a few photos on Bodmin Moor, by Dozmary Pool. This is close to Jamaica Inn.

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I also went walking from Minions (a real village!) to the Hurlers and Cheesewring Mine in this dress and leather boots. Proof it is practical to walk across the moors in a dress. I wore a What Katie Did corset too (a version similar to the Sophia), just to find out what it was like, and it actually kept me nice and warm! It wasn’t uncomfortable, as I’m not training my waist, but just wore it snug to my natural shape. The support for good posture was actually quite nice, but I couldn’t curl up on the sofa!

Anyone else done this or am I the only one? Comment, DM on Instagram or email any enquiries about the dress. Any requests are made to order.

The Assassination Bureau (Miss Winter)

Diana Rigg as Miss Winter in The Assassination Bureau has a beautiful and practical wardrobe as the Modern Woman of the turn of the (last) century. In aspiring to this look, which is great working in a library, I have made a skirt, restyled a hat and hunted down a round collared white shirt (Madamoiselle R).

I bought a large straw boater and unravelled it to the base size I needed. Then I hand stitched around, bending the straw at the beginning of the side edge and the brim. Once the brim was the desired width, I tied it off and flattened the front brim with heavy books while turning the back up. It can be dressed with different ribbons.

The blouse with the round collar is good for 1920-30’s (Peaky Blinders) dressing too.

The skirt is an A-line cut, and the elasticated wide belt nips in the waist without wearing a corset underneath!

Here is an outfit not yet attempted. I do have a steam punk pattern for a skirt with a deep pleated hem, and my mum has made an outfit with a matching jacket, which I’ll post soon.

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Accesssories

Original 1910’s dress (Downton Abbey style)

This beautiful, delicate dress was entrusted to me by one of my friends. It belonged to a relative who wore it during the period, probably, 1910’s – notice the looser fit, the belt at the natural waist, shin length.

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Made from silk, tortoiseshell belt buckle, which has possibly been replaced. Embroidery of flowers, pin tuck pleats, peter pan collar and front detail.

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Embroidery on skirt
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Pin tucks on back
Collar, back
Collar, back
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Front panel
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Belt
Sleeve cuff
Sleeve cuff

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